In the dark about dark matter

Plasma and electricity in space. Failure of gravity-only cosmology. Exposing the myths of dark matter, dark energy, black holes, neutron stars, and other mathematical constructs. The electric model of stars. Predictions and confirmations of the electric comet.

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Re: In the dark about dark matter

Unread postby querious » Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:19 pm

Good to see the predictions from Big Bang modeling are being borne out....

From http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/10/astronomers-say-they-ve-found-many-universe-s-missing-atoms . . .

Cosmologists know roughly how much hydrogen and helium was created during the first 20 minutes after the big bang. These numbers are corroborated by studies of the afterglow of the big bang—the so-called cosmic microwave background (CMB)—which suggests that our universe is made of roughly 70% dark energy, 23% dark matter, and only 4.6% of ordinary, or baryonic, matter. However, stars and galaxies account for only about 10% of the inferred ordinary matter, and all told researchers cannot account for up to half of atoms they think should exist.

“This is embarrassing, as you can imagine,” says astronomer Renyue Cen of Princeton University, who was not involved in the new work. “Not only do we have most of matter which is dark, and most of energy which is still darker; but of the 5% which is normal atoms, most are missing.”

Researchers think they know where the baryons are. According to the standard cosmological model, which predicts how the universe has grown and changed since its earliest days, the universe is filled with enormous strands of dark matter, and the galaxies are embedded in this so-called cosmic web. Scientists hypothesize that the missing atoms lie in diffuse clouds of highly ionized gas stretching between the galaxies. Known as warm-hot intergalactic matter (WHIM), that million-degree gas glows in x-rays, but is so thin it’s very hard to see. Using observatories that can see ultraviolet radiation, like the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have spotted enough WHIM to account for about 50% to 70% of the missing baryons—still leaving a significant fraction unaccounted for.

. . . .

The results suggest that matter in the cosmic web is about six times more dense than the universal average, enough to comprise about 30% of the missing mass. An independent study posted to arXiv on 15 September using the SZ technique on 260,000 galaxy pairs reached a similar conclusion.
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Re: In the dark about dark matter

Unread postby neilwilkes » Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:16 am

Zyxzevn wrote:......how can we convince the mainstream that their idea is not working?


Maybe by pointing them at http://www.suspicious0bservers.org and also this excellent summary of why Dark Matter if not yet actually dead & buried is at least dead & on the way to the cemetery
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuwkbGA ... e=youtu.be

Lots of reports to wade through but everywhere they have looked for DM they have spectacularly failed to find it - and falsified a few other ideas along the way too.
You will never get a man to understand something his salary depends on him not understanding.
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Re: In the dark about dark matter

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:49 pm

neilwilkes wrote:Lots of reports to wade through but everywhere they have looked for DM they have spectacularly failed to find it - and falsified a few other ideas along the way too.


Spectacular failure ndeed. They've blown many billions of dollars now on LHC experiments, LUX experiments, Xenon-100/1T experiments, PandaX experiments, etc, etc, etc and they have found absolutely nothing that supports their exotic matter claims.

Meanwhile the standard particle physics model has passed very test, and correctly predicted every observation at LHC, including many specific decay predictions.

Even the astronomical basis of the dark matter claim has been falsified a half dozen ways now. They grossly underestimated the number of whole stars in that now infamous Bullet Clusterf*ck study by a whopping factor of between 3 and 20 times, and that's just *one* of the errors they made in that study. They've also found two plasma and gas halos around our own galaxy that contain more mass than all the stars combined, and that ordinary mass is located *exactly* where their 'dark matter" models predicted.

Dark matter has been the most spectacular physics failure of the 21st century. The dollars wasted on the concept have been astronomical, and the results have consistently failed to match their "predictions". The money wasted on dark matter claims is simply unbelievable, yet the mainsteam clings to their claims regardless of all the failures and all the negative results. Dark matter theory is literally the ultimate physics money pit.
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Re: In the dark about dark matter

Unread postby BeAChooser » Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:16 pm

Michael Mozina wrote:Dark matter has been the most spectacular physics failure of the 21st century. The dollars wasted on the concept have been astronomical, and the results have consistently failed to match their "predictions". The money wasted on dark matter claims is simply unbelievable, yet the mainsteam clings to their claims regardless of all the failures and all the negative results. Dark matter theory is literally the ultimate physics money pit.


Indeed!
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