Planetary orbits and spins

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

Moderators: MGmirkin, bboyer

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Kapriel » Sat Jan 31, 2009 11:58 pm

Steve Smith wrote:I have a suggestion re: the "new water" on Earth. Since Saturn is composed of hydrogen and small percentages of other elements (similar to a "cold star"), then the disruption of the Saturnian Configuration could have provided plenty of hydrogen to interact with the oxygen on Earth. Voila, a Great Deluge accompanied by terrifying global electrodynamic effects.


Would not such an addition of fresh water from Saturn have disrupted the ecological balance necessary for ancient salt-sea life forms?
Doubt is not proof.
User avatar
Kapriel
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 9:17 pm

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Kapriel » Sun Feb 01, 2009 12:08 am

Steve Smith wrote: If there were "mantle plumes" shallow or deep, they were caused by the secondary discharge pathways erupting out of the Earth to meet the oppositely charged leaders descending from the planet, or plasma cloud, or Birkeland current that was the initiator.


I quite agree. But there is a hitch that bothers me: would secondary plumes discharge in such a regular fashion that they create a trail of successive event occurances that spans the globe? Plumes, by definition, ought to appear in more of a randomized pattern. Or so I would think. I might liken them to sunspots, except that these seem far more randomized than our terrestrial plumes.
Doubt is not proof.
User avatar
Kapriel
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 9:17 pm

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Steve Smith » Sun Feb 01, 2009 7:00 am

I would say that Kimberlite pipes, plutons, and salt domes are areas where smaller discharges drew ionized underground material together (magma could be considered solid plasma since it carries a charge), pulling it upward. When the discharge passed, the structures re-solidified. Obviously, halite is another charged substance.

Canadian Salt Dome

Iranian Salt Dome

Looking Glass Rock pluton
Steve Smith
Guest
 

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Steve Smith » Sun Feb 01, 2009 7:35 am

Would not such an addition of fresh water from Saturn have disrupted the ecological balance necessary for ancient salt-sea life forms?


It might have, thus contributing to the ecological and geographical reformation of our planet. As I mentioned in another thread, there are beds of fossil fish containing thousands of specimens.

It wasn't just the water. During the Event(s) of the recent past, the plasma discharges hoisted megatons of dust and debris into space, where it subsequently fell back, smothering large areas -- including the oceans.
Steve Smith
Guest
 

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Steve Smith » Sun Feb 01, 2009 7:38 am

Do you agree with NewGeology's claim that neutron capture could be how most radioactive decay occurs and that it can occur very rapidly, instead of over billions of years?


I don't know. I've never heard of the process before.
Steve Smith
Guest
 

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Steve Smith » Thu Feb 05, 2009 9:08 am

I retract my recommendation that everyone view the UTube link about Henrik Svensmark. In email discussions with Lars Mortensen, the producer/director, it constitues a copyright violation to have the video posted there.
Steve Smith
Guest
 

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby psi » Sun Feb 08, 2009 10:56 am

Steve Smith wrote:
The only thing I disagree with in his and Nir Shaviv's analysis is the time scales and the radiogenic dating methods. Since the Earth was bombarded by electrical impulses from space (5000 years ago) beyond anything witnessed today by many orders of magnitude, then the dating of the rock strata and the "millions of years" of climate records that they say exist is open to question.

As been discussed elsewhere, cosmic rays alter the isotopic ratios -- for example creating more C-14 than should exist -- so the data from rock layers is insubstantial.


Steve, can you point me to a primer on this 5000 yr bombardment event? Thanks.
psi
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 7:29 pm

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby psi » Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:34 am

Steve Smith wrote:I retract my recommendation that everyone view the UTube link about Henrik Svensmark. In email discussions with Lars Mortensen, the producer/director, it constitues a copyright violation to have the video posted there.



Oops. That's too bad. Its a wonderful way to get the ideas out.
psi
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 7:29 pm

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Sun Feb 08, 2009 12:49 pm

psi wrote:
Steve Smith wrote:I retract my recommendation that everyone view the UTube link about Henrik Svensmark. In email discussions with Lars Mortensen, the producer/director, it constitues a copyright violation to have the video posted there.



Oops. That's too bad. Its a wonderful way to get the ideas out.
I agree. It is essentially free advertising.
If I have the least bit of knowledge
I will follow the great Way alone
and fear nothing but being sidetracked.
The great Way is simple
but people delight in complexity.
Tao Te Ching, 53.
Grey Cloud
 
Posts: 2477
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2008 5:47 am
Location: NW UK

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Steve Smith » Sun Feb 08, 2009 3:45 pm

Thunderbolts of the Gods.
Steve Smith
Guest
 

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby psi » Sun Feb 08, 2009 8:13 pm

Steve Smith wrote:Thunderbolts of the Gods.



Shit. You mean I have to *buy* it? :)
psi
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 7:29 pm

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Osmosis » Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:50 pm

Buy it, then *buy* it ;) ;)
Osmosis
 
Posts: 422
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:52 pm
Location: San Jose, California

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby Steve Smith » Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:01 pm

You can watch it on UTube, as well. There is an hour-long presentation there. See Dave, Wal, Mel, Don, Rens and others describe the Electric Universe and its connection with mythology.
Steve Smith
Guest
 

Re: Intriguing discussion on the role of planetary mechanics

Unread postby psi » Mon Feb 09, 2009 9:00 pm

Steve Smith wrote:You can watch it on UTube, as well. There is an hour-long presentation there. See Dave, Wal, Mel, Don, Rens and others describe the Electric Universe and its connection with mythology.


Great. I'll do both. Thanks to all you guys for providing such a wonderful abundance of resources.
psi
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 7:29 pm

The Allais Effect in the Electric Universe?

Unread postby nick c » Mon May 11, 2009 1:36 pm

I thought that it might be interesting to start a thread devoted to the Allais effect and its' implications, if any, to the Electric Universe.

It has been more than 50 years since the Allais effect was first reported. Mainstream has been perplexed by the anomalous results of this experiment, but is not about to announce that the "law" of gravity has been repealed, various explanations within the framework of the present paradigm have been proposed. There is going to be future testing of the effect, no doubt with varied explanations.
From another thread:
Komorikid wrote:This is known as the Allais effect after Frenchman Maurice Allais. In 1954 while experimenting with a pendulum he noted anomalous precession of the plane of oscillation of a pendulum during a solar eclipse which appeared to violate the standard theory of Gravity. The experiment has been repeated since several time and the each time the anomaly has been detected to various degrees. It has largely been denied by mainstream science but there are those who still want to investigate the anomaly.
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=1727

[url2=http://www.allais.info/]Maurice Allais[/url2] (b 1911) is a brilliant thinker, he won a Nobel Prize (1988) in Economics, but is best described with the generic term... "scientist." In the end it could turnout that his greatest contribution stems from a physics experiment.
-A paper by Allais:
M.F.C. Allais, Mouvement du pendule paraconique et éclipse totale de Soleil du 30
juin 1954, C.R. Acad. Sci. 245 (1957) 2001.
another one:
Maurice F. C. Allais. Should the laws of gravity be reconsidered? Part I { Abnormalities in the motion of a paraconical pendulum on an anisotropic support. Aero/Space Engineering, pages 46-52, September 1959.

nick c
User avatar
nick c
Moderator
 
Posts: 2436
Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:12 pm
Location: connecticut

PreviousNext

Return to Electric Universe - Planetary Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest