The Jupiter Myth

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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JP Michael
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The Jupiter Myth

Unread post by JP Michael » Sat Nov 16, 2019 1:46 am

I somehow found randomly a 3 part series called The Jupiter Myth. It is an attempt at a more comprehensive development of Talbott's The Saturn Myth. I could not find any references to it on this forum except one reference to Jno Cook's website of the same name (but not The Jupiter Myth specifically).

Did anyone have any views or critiques of their approach utilising the Nice Cosmological Model?

I did like the fact that this model is far more attentive to the role of Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus in the development of our current solar system in the past, as well as attentiveness to the role of visible-from-earth plasma 'plumes' emanating from the gas giants as they moved out to more distant orbits.

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nick c
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Re: The Jupiter Myth

Unread post by nick c » Sat Nov 16, 2019 3:18 pm

hi JP
There has been discussions of the writings of the late Jno Cook on this forum over the years:
A search of the forum:
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpB ... mit=Search

Some of the search results do not have any relation to Jno Cook, but mixed in there, are many relevant posts.

I have read some of his work and my impression is that his dating is too precise. That is, the reasons for his dating of events to specific years is not justified by the evidence. If you notice Cardona, Cochrane, and Talbot generally date events as approximations, and are more interested in the sequence.

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JP Michael
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Re: The Jupiter Myth

Unread post by JP Michael » Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:12 pm

nick c wrote:I have read some of his work and my impression is that his dating is too precise. That is, the reasons for his dating of events to specific years is not justified by the evidence. If you notice Cardona, Cochrane, and Talbot generally date events as approximations, and are more interested in the sequence.
I have noticed that exact criticism, yes, having already read much of Talbott and Cardona (can't afford Cochrane yet cuz Cardona's were so dang $$$!) Thanks Nick.

Whilst I have my own YEC-inspired hypothesis concerning the timeline, it is the sequence of events and, more importantly, the specific players during each sequence that I am trying to nail down concretely and specifically. Talbott and Cardona (from what I've read so far) focus more on Saturn than Jupiter, with hardly any reference to Uranus or Neptune. In this regard, Jno Cook does a better job of holistic integration, even if his model is excessively (and perhaps incorrectly) precise.

<Moderator Note: several paragraphs have been removed (at the poster's request) because they lacked context due to the splitting of this thread>

Younger Dryas
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Re: The Jupiter Myth

Unread post by Younger Dryas » Sat Dec 14, 2019 3:32 pm

As reiterated by the late Jno Cook to myself:


Many catastrophists still accept Velikovsky's ideas. Others, such as David Talbott, Wall Thornhill, and Dwardu Cardona of the Thunderbolts group, hold that nothing ever happened after the so-called Polar Configuration came apart. Considering (as I do) the huge assembly of mythology which recounts these events, spread over three continents, with Mesoamerica detailing this with identifiable dates, I am astounded at the oversight. What else could be expected as the winding down of the cataclysm with the removal of Saturn except further adjustments and interactions of the loosened planets?

I also came to the conclusion that some very large aspects of the past -- including some immense events -- had been overlooked by some of the most able researchers. Both the Velikovskians and the Thunderbolts people have remained completely unaware of these particular events -- and not that both could not have been discovered among available texts. You will not have to be able to read dead languages to find the information.
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)

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