Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby dahlenaz » Wed Apr 02, 2008 11:54 am

Stefan, Thanks for all this material. I noticed that i missed an aspect of an earlier post where you mentioned Alfven's book. I'm trying to get a copy of it to match with your clips. d...z

http://www.electric-spark-scars.com
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby StefanR » Wed Apr 02, 2008 2:38 pm

Of course my words and ideas are not authorative of course.
Just trying to add by association.
I'm not sure of course but I found it strange that some of the references to sanddunes/ripples on the
crater floors etc. Were called one time fuvial, than eolian, sometimes even planely unknown.
Of course appearance isn't anything. But then again some of the features are strangely intermingeling
but still all part of the harder underlayer which is made of the salts of different composition.
Also Olivine on Mars, as already stated by the TB-POD's, has certain properties which are characteristic.
I included the Alfven book quotes as they do seem authorative. And the combination of information
about resistance/resistivity and the alfven info about arcing and the skin effect will give some extra
potential for background information in relation to the experiments you did. At least that just what
I'm guessing.


COMETARY MAGNETOSPHERES: A TUTORIAL
http://www2.ku.edu/~kuspace/aeronomy/comet-tutorial.pdf
Image
Magnetic field strength (color scale shown in figure) and field lines in the inner coma of comet
Halley from a numerical global 3-dimensional MHD model. From Gombosi et al. (J. Geophys. Res.,
1996); copyright 1996 American Geophysical Union
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=327#p327

Composition of comet dust
http://roland.mpae.gwdg.de/cosac/news/T ... z_Caro.pdf

Quote:
Comet dust consists of organics
(poorly characterized) + partially
crystalline silicates + ...
High O/C and H/C ratios for
Halley's dust (Fomenkova '94,'99).
Low O/C, H/C and high N/C ratios
for 81P/Wild 2 (Kissel et al. '04).
)Dust composition varies among
comets but is rich in heteroatoms
(O or N).


Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs)
Quote:
IDPs are collected in the
stratosphere and some have
cometary origin. They mainly
consist of silicate grains coated by
carbonaceous material.
The carbon fraction in IDPs is
amorphous carbon with different
degrees of hydrogenation, i.e. a
poorly graphitized carbon with
aromatic size domains 1.6 nm,
linked by aliphatic chains with
CH2/CH3=2.8-5.5.
The O and N contents, relative to C,
in IDPs is low compared to organics
made by ice UV or ion irradiation.
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=333#p333

Resistors/Carbon (Holmes-thread)

Carbon Comets (Holmes-thread)

Observations of rotating jets of carbon monoxide
http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:3Ggb ... d=35&gl=nl
http://www.lesia.obspm.fr/~crovisier/bi ... _EMP.ps.gz.
Quote:
The maps show evidence for asymmetrical patterns, due tothe existence of CO jets. Analysis of the spectra and their velocity shifts shows thatthere is a spiral CO jet rotating in a plane almost perpendicular to the sky plane.This is the rst time that rotating jets are observed for parent molecules. We havedeveloped a 3-D model simulating rotating spiral jets of CO gas......
The velocity shift (the rstorder moment of the spectrum) is moving from positive to negativevelocities. This is indicative of a jet which direction is moving fromanti-Earthward to Earthward. The time evolution of the line velocityshift is plotted in Fig. 1.b. This curve is well tted by a sinusoid witha period equal to the nucleus rotation period .....
Since the comet rotation axis was close to the sky plane(Jorda et al., 1999), the small negative valuev0= 0:05 km s1thatis observed is indicative of a northern jet located slightly above the equator.....
The real structure of the jet may be more complicated than assumed, especiallywithin the rst thousand of kilometres from the nucleus. The ques-tion of its physical origin remains open. Here, we observed that nearly half of the CO was released in a small opening angle. It is then hard to explain how a highly volatile molecule can expand is such a wayfrom a porous nucleus, as expected for comet Hale-Bopp.


MESSENGER saw an internal magnetic field that is well described by the field from a dipole nearly aligned with the planet’s spin axis (dipole tilt ~ 10°). This geometry is similar to that observed by Mariner 10 during its first flyby. The field strength is weaker by about one third than that detected by Mariner 10 during its third (and last) flyby, owing primarily to the difference in trajectories (Mariner 10 flow directly over the magnetic pole where the field strength is greatest). When corrected for our best estimate for the external field, the MESSENGER observations and the two Mariner 10 passes are consistent with very similar solutions for the mean planetary magnetic dipole. The dipolar field is consistent with an active electrical dynamo in which the magnetic field is produced by electrical currents flowing in an outer core of molten metal. The observations do not yet allow us to identify whether a small secular variation may have occurred, determine higher order structure in the field, or assess whether crustal magnetic signatures may be present at other longitudes. A combination of the next two flybys and the orbital phase of MESSENGER’s mission will be required to sort out all of these possible effects.
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/image.php?page=1&gallery_id=2&image_id=152

Seeking Information on Mercury’s Mineralogy
The top plot shows the ground track of observations made by the Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) component of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS). The ground track is projected onto a MESSENGER image of the portion of the planet seen in high-resolution by MESSENGER for the first time.

The bottom plot shows the relative spectral reflectance as a function of wavelength at the two locations indicated on the previous graphic. The visible and infrared portions of the spectra are shown for the two nearby areas, one including ejected material from a bright, relatively young crater and the other from surrounding plains. The two spectra have been shifted vertically to match at 850 nm (in the near-infrared). Differences between the two spectra, most notable in the infrared, are indicative of differences in the mineral abundances in these two regions.
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/image.php?page=1&gallery_id=2&image_id=150

MESSENGER Flies through Mercury’s Magnetosphere
This animation shows a conceptual sketch of Mercury’s magnetosphere at the time of the MESSENGER flyby. The graphs at the bottom show observations made by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) portion of the Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) instrument as the spacecraft followed the indicated trajectory. The top plot depicts the low-energy plasma of solar wind origin, and the bottom plot shows heavy ion intensities associated with the planet. This flyby was the first survey of the ion plasma of Mercury's space environment. The positions at which the spacecraft first crossed the “bow shock” of the magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind, passed closest approach to the planet, and crossed the outbound bow-shock crossing are indicated.

These results show the expected increases in solar wind plasma density downstream of the bow-shock boundary, as well as significant solar wind plasma densities within Mercury's magnetosphere close to the planet. The latter measurements provide definitive evidence that Mercury's magnetosphere – despite its small size – is not a vacuum but hosts significant densities of heated solar wind plasma. The plasma affects the magnetic field, contributes to the “space weathering” of the planet’s surface, and sputters material from the surface to populate the exosphere. This first detection of heavy pick-up ions, Na+ and other species, near Mercury is consistent with their production by ionization of exospheric neutral species.
This complex system and all of its time variations will be studied during the next two MESSENGER flybys as well as throughout the orbital phase of the mission.
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/image.php?page=1&gallery_id=2&image_id=153
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby StefanR » Sun Apr 06, 2008 12:55 pm

Image
Published by S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan
http://www.peter-thomson.co.uk/tornado/index.html

Maybe there is some info to on over there too.
(Thanks to Lizzie for posting it in the New Insights-forum under the charge sheath vortex-heading)
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby starbiter » Sun Apr 06, 2008 1:36 pm

When i read the NASA Messenger quotes about sputtering on the surface of Mercury i looked to see if it was a quote from Wal. I'm still blinking my eyes. That's fron NASA?


These results show the expected increases in solar wind plasma density downstream of the bow-shock boundary, as well as significant solar wind plasma densities within Mercury's magnetosphere close to the planet. The latter measurements provide definitive evidence that Mercury's magnetosphere – despite its small size – is not a vacuum but hosts significant densities of heated solar wind plasma. The plasma affects the magnetic field, contributes to the “space weathering” of the planet’s surface, and sputters material from the surface to populate the exosphere. This first detection of heavy pick-up ions, Na+ and other species, near Mercury is consistent with their production by ionization of exospheric neutral species. This complex system and all of its time variations will be studied during the next two MESSENGER flybys as well as throughout the orbital phase of the mission.
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby dahlenaz » Mon Apr 07, 2008 8:15 am

StefanR wrote:http://www.peter-thomson.co.uk/tornado/images/plasma-from-gun-electrode.jpg
Published by S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan
http://www.peter-thomson.co.uk/tornado/index.html

Maybe there is some info to on over there too.
(Thanks to Lizzie for posting it in the New Insights-forum under the charge sheath vortex-heading)


This is quite an interesting site as plasma considerations go, the series of images above in particular. The third image shows something that needs further explaination. The bright column returning to the left electrode after snaking across the middle is verious curious. His experiment with the petri dish and tornado is another winner. I'm wondering what would happen if the lids of the dish were to have magnets attahced or a capacitance established between the two lids. Might discharge patterns be formed on the lit surfaces or some other exotic pattern or form of tornado?

The Nasa description of sputtering was brought to Wal's attention prior to his article. There are some unspecified details though. Does the sputtering occur on the surface directly facing the sun or does it occur as the surface enters the night side, keeping in mind the disovery of the recent probes that measured earths tail region, what i would call the burble region. I seem to recall there was some activity which moved toward earth rather than away. Might a similar condition occur around where the cusp and the night side and the aurora merge on Mercury? Just a abstract thought that is also related to thoughts about the formation of nighttime tornados on earth. d...z
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby dahlenaz » Thu Apr 10, 2008 1:09 pm

http://www.zone-vx.com/tlo.pdf

Above is a link to a group project on Bright Lunar Rays and there are two images shown there which may be important to the evaluation of certain rayed features and distinguishing between ones such as Mercury's, mentioned earlier.

The images are of Tycho, one shows the rays surrounding the crater clearly, the other does no and a key point for me writing this is that there are no obvious surface patterns that would give any indication of the rayed features. d..z
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby StefanR » Thu Apr 10, 2008 2:56 pm

Yes, it is something that shows up in other places too, because of the use of IR/UV-filters.

Hirise was so nice to play along with us, and gave some images of Phobos;

The illuminated part of Phobos visible in the images is about 21 km across. Images from previous spacecraft have been of smaller pixel scale (for example, Mars Global Surveyor got data at 4 m/pixel, because this spacecraft came closer to Phobos), but the HiRISE images have greater signal-to-noise, making the new data some of the best ever for Phobos.
Image
The most prominent feature in the images is the large impact crater Stickney, in the lower right. With a diameter of 9 km, it is the largest feature on Phobos. A series of grooves and crater chains is obvious on the other parts of the moon. Although many appear radial to Stickney in the images, previous studies show that the grooves radiate from a different point on Phobos. Hypotheses for their formation vary. Some scientists believe the grooves and crater chains are related to the formation of Stickney, whereas others think they may have formed from ejecta from impacts on Mars that later collided with Phobos. The lineated textures on the walls of Stickney and other large craters are landslides formed from materials falling into the crater interiors in the weak Phobos gravity (less than 1/1000th the gravity on Earth)
Image
IRB COLOR
Both PSP_007769_9010 and PSP_007769_9015 were made by combining data from HiRISE’s blue/green, red, and near-infrared channels. The color data accentuate details not apparent in the black and white images. For example, materials near the rim of Stickney appear bluer than the rest of Phobos. Based on analogy with materials on our own moon, this could mean this surface is fresher, and therefore younger, than other parts of Phobos


http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/phobos.php
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Tycho

Unread postby StefanR » Thu Apr 10, 2008 5:29 pm

LUNAR TRANSIENT PHENOMENA HISTORY
Image
Rather unexpectedly, the rays cannot be traced inside Tycho itself. There is a ray free area round the rampart, showing darkish under a high light, where the streaks stop short; neither do they radiate from the exact centre of Tycho, since many of them are tangential to the walls. Yet there can be no doubt that the rays were produced at the time of impact which formed the crater-and since the rays cross all other formations this is proof positive that Tycho must be the youngest structure in this part of the Moon. One ray stretches right beyond the Mare Serenitatis, passing close to the bright little crater Bessel, and there has been a great deal of discussion as to whether this is one long, genuine 'Tycho ray' or whether it has been renewed along its course - though it is not easy to see just how this happened. In January 1968 the Surveyor 7 space-craft made a gentle touch-down on the outer slopes of Tycho, and sent back excellent pictures. It is still there, and one day no doubt, it will be collected and taken away to a lunar museum." Patrick Moore On the Moon January 2001.
Image
Close up view of the central peak complex inside the crater Tycho. During the last twenty years I have witnessed numerous strange appearances of the central peak. Looking like a comet nucleus with a star in the center of the cloud, this star will wink in and out slowly and after several minutes will disappear. I have also documented strange arches of light crossing the crater floor while it still deep in shadow. I was also succeeded by capturing on video a wish bone shaped glow extending from the central peak to the eastern wall. You can learn more about these observations by going to L.T.P. Reports on the left column and then clicking on the Tycho reports.
Image
"Three mosaics of the same scene over the crater Tycho (43°S, 11°W; 85 kilometers in diameter). On the right is a “stretched” color mosaic of the crater, exaggerating the relatively blue reflectance of the central peak. The false, multicolor version (center) further exaggerates these color contrasts and allows different color (rock) units to be distinguished. The simple ratio image (left) shows the location of fresh, “mafic” material (i.e., materials relatively rich in iron and magnesium). Such color data from Clementine permit lunar scientists to map rock types over the entire surface of the Moon."


The three color images below show Tycho in different wave lengths to allow for identification of different rock types found inside the crater. At present I have found no match to the shapes of the illumination observed and to the different rock types found on the crater floor. This examination was done going on the premise that light may be reflecting off the crater rim illuminating shadow filled crater floor.
http://www.ltpresearch.org/tycho1.htm

Image
Earth's Moon is normally seen in subtle shades of grey or yellow. But small color differences have been greatly exaggerated to make this dramatic mosaic image of the Moon's gibbous phase. The familiar Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis) is the blue area right of center. White lines radiate from the crater Tycho at bottom left, while purplish tones mottle the crater Copernicus left of center. Though exaggerated, the different colors are recognized to correspond to real differences in the chemical makeup of the lunar surface - blue hues reveal titanium rich areas while orange and purple colors show regions relatively poor in titanium and iron. Calibrated by rock samples from the Apollo missions, similar multicolor images from spacecraft have been used to explore the Moon's global surface composition.
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060216.html
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby StefanR » Thu Apr 10, 2008 5:45 pm

Image
This unnamed crater on Mercury, 85 kilometers across, looks like a twin of the lunar crater Tycho. Radar soundings by the Arecibo radio telescope in mid-2001 revealed the 900-km-wide splash of bright rays — an indication that the crater is geologically very young.
....
The rays look so fresh, in fact, that this crater may be much younger than similarly sized Tycho, which was blasted out of the lunar landscape 109 million years ago
http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/3305786.html?page=1&c=y

Image
Analyzing the global distribution of maria and terrae, it is evident that the former dominate the Moon's western hemisphere while in the east the latter prevail. It is for this simple reason that, at first-quarter, the Moon is considerably brighter than when it is is observed at last-quarter (see title image above). Major impact craters can already be distinguished with small instruments. At certain times, particularly at or near full-moon, some craters (yellow dots in above right image) are seen associated with bright irregular lines that irradiate from them (cyan lines). These are called lunar rays, and correspond to the ejecta that were produced during the impacts that originated the craters. Bright and/or ray-associated craters are usually recent events (at an astronomical time-scale), and not always correspond to the larger craters visible on the Moon. Some of the ray systems that can be easily spotted with small instruments are those associated with craters Tycho (1), Byrgius A (2), Kepler (3), Copernicus (4), Aristarchus (5), Anaxagoras (6), Thales (7), Proclus (8) and Stevinus A (9). Other craters easily spotted with binoculars have dark floors, like for instance Plato and Grimaldi. This appearance usually correspond to craters that were partially flooded with mare lava.
http://www.astrosurf.com/cidadao/moon_obs.htm
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Lunar Crater Rays

Unread postby StefanR » Thu Apr 10, 2008 6:04 pm

Lunar Crater Rays Point to a New Lunar Time Scale

The Lunar Time Scale should be reevaluated -- suggest remote sensing studies of lunar crater rays by B. Ray Hawke (University of Hawai'i) and colleagues at the University of Hawai'i, NovaSol, Cornell University, National Air and Space Museum, and Northwestern University. These scientists have found that the mere presence of crater rays is not a reliable indicator that the crater is young, as once thought, and that the working definition of the Copernican/Eratosthenian (C/E) boundary should be reconsidered. The team used Earth-based spectral and radar data with FeO, TiO2, and optical maturity maps derived from Clementine UVVIS images to determine the origin and composition of selected lunar ray segments. They conclude that the optical maturity parameter, which uses chemical analyses of lunar samples as its foundation, should be used to redefine the C/E boundary. Under this classification, the Copernican System would be defined as the time required for an immature surface to reach full optical maturity

Lunar crater rays are those obvious bright streaks of material that we can see extending radially away from many impact craters. Historically, they were once regarded as salt deposits from evaporated water (early 1900s) and volcanic ash or dust streaks (late 1940s). Beginning in the 1960s, with the pioneering work of Eugene Shoemaker, rays were recognized as fragmental material ejected from primary and secondary craters during impact events. Their formation was an important mechanism for moving rocks around the lunar surface and rays were considered when planning the Apollo landing sites.

Chemical analyses of lunar samples provide "ground truth" to understand the geologic processes on the Moon. Specifically, the discoveries by cosmochemists of nanophase-iron grain coatings, Fe-Si phases, and other space weathering products in lunar rocks and meteorites have enabled us to better understand the physical, chemical, and optical changes that occur over time as the lunar surface is exposed to the space environment and matures. Older surfaces in which these changes have reached a steady state are said to be fully mature. Younger surfaces are called immature.

Space weathering products in the lunar material, which can only be discovered by sample analysis, affect the spectral signatures of the Moon's surface.


Take a look below at the Clementine albedo images and derived maps of FeO, TiO2, and optical maturity parameter (OMAT) for each ray segment studied by Hawke and colleagues. Toggle between maps by moving your cursor over the three rectangular buttons [FeO, TiO2, and OMAT] below the images.

General point to consider: Bright areas in the albedo images are either due to the presence of low FeO material or an immature surface. The dark lunar maria are lava plains composed of an Fe-rich rock called basalt. The brighter highlands are made of rocks much lower in FeO.

Following the images, we will discuss the results of the integration of Clementine data with the Earth-based near-IR and radar data for the crater rays.

(Really take a look at the site for the pictures!! Very nice!)

Messier Crater Complex. Near-IR spectra as well as the FeO, TiO2, and maturity maps indicate that the south and west rays of the Messier complex are composed of debris from immature mare basalts. They appear bright in radar images. Highlands material is not present in these rays, hence they are bright because they are immature.

Tycho Ray in Mare Nectaris. The portion of Tycho ray in Mare Nectaris is composed largely of immature mare basalt with little to no detectable Tycho ejecta material. The ray is dominated by fresh local material excavated and emplaced by the secondary craters as well as fresh material that is constantly exposed on the crater walls due to landslides. This ray segment is bright because it is immature.

Tycho Ray in Southern Highlands. This ray segment is composed of relatively immature highland debris. But it is not possible to determine how much of the material is local and how much is projectile material blasted in from Tycho Crater. This ray segment is bright because it is immature.

Lichtenberg Crater Rays. FeO and TiO2 abundances for these rays are consistent with highland rocks. The optical maturity map demonstrates that these highlands-rich ejecta deposits and rays are fully mature. Hence, these rays are bright because of their composition.

Olbers A Ray. This high-albedo ray, which was deposited on a mare surface, has reduced FeO and TiO2 abundances, consistent with the presence of a large non-mare component. Much of the ray is not distinct in the optical maturity map but some areas are bright in the OMAT (see arrows A, B, and C) suggesting that these areas are not as mature as the adjacent terrain. This ray has a significant amount of highlands ejecta debris and is bright because of composition and immaturity, and is a good example of a "combination" ray.

The work by Hawke and others shows that the brightness of rays is due to immaturity and/or compositional differences.

http://www.psrd.hawaii.edu/Sept04/LunarRays.html

New Mineral Proves an Old Idea about Space Weathering
Discovered in a lunar meteorite, a new mineral named hapkeite honors the scientist, Bruce Hapke (Emeritis Professor at University of Pittsburgh), who nearly 30 years ago predicted the importance of vaporization as one of the processes in space weathering. The new iron silicide mineral (Fe2Si) was announced by the research team of Mahesh Anand (formerly at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and now at the Natural History Museum, London), Larry Taylor (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Mikhail Nazarov (Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow), Jinfu Shu, Ho-kwang Mao, and Russell Hemley (Carnegie Institution of Washington). This mineral likely formed by impact vaporization of the lunar soil and subsequent condensation of the iron and silicon into tiny metal grains. The researchers conclude that Fe-Si phases are more common in the lunar soil than previously thought. It is nanophase-sized Fe0, these Fe-Si phases, and other space weathering products that profoundly affect the optical properties of the lunar soil at visible and near infrared wavelengths and must be taken into account when interpreting remote sensing data of the Moon.

http://www.psrd.hawaii.edu/July04/newMineral.html

Moonbeams and Elements
To determine how a planetary body formed and evolved, we must determine the chemical compositions of distinctive geologic regions on it. It is never possible to obtain enough samples of a planet to do this job thoroughly, so planetary scientists have searched for ways of determining chemical compositions from orbit, which would allow chemical mapping of the entire surface.
Image
The FeO concentration on the nearside (top image) and the farside (bottom image) of the Moon are shown in these images made from Clementine data and the FeO technique. The maria are obvious on the nearside image, showing up in red and yellow. On the farside image, there is a big green splotch, which marks the enormous South Pole-Aitken basin, an impact crater 2500 km across. It has higher iron than its surroundings, probably because it dug up the lower crust and mantle, which are probably higher in FeO than the highlands.
http://www.psrd.hawaii.edu/Oct97/MoonFeO.html
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby seasmith » Thu Apr 10, 2008 6:16 pm

Image

NASA and University of Alabama researchers...have been shooting moondust with electrons, levitating moondust using electric fields, and scrutinizing moondust under an electron microscope. All this is happening at the National Space Science and Technology Center's "Dusty Plasma Lab" in Huntsville, Alabama

Dust on the moon is electrified, at least in part, by exposure to the solar wind.




Moondust in the Wind
04.10.2008



"We've had some surprising results," says Abbas "We're finding that individual dust grains do not act the same as larger amounts of moon dust put together. Existing theories based on calculations of the charge of a large amount of moondust don't apply to the moondust at the single particle level."


More conclusions from the Abbas et al study:

* The number of electrons ejected per incident electron for small (less than one micrometer) dust grains was found to be much larger than those for bulk moon dust.

* Small positively charged dust grains (grains with a deficiency of electrons) lose electrons (charge more positively) upon bombardment with an electron beam. Large positively charged grains gain electrons (discharge) to some constant charge (called equilibrium charge).

* Both small and large negatively charged dust grains (grains with extra electrons) eject electrons (and therefore take on a less negative charge) upon bombardment.

* Both positive and negative dust grains may co-exist in the same lunar environment.


http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2008/10apr_moondustinthewind.htm?list1066595
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby sol88 » Fri Apr 11, 2008 12:28 am

Amazing!

Bloody good thread :D

And electricity doe's nothing in space, :roll:
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby dahlenaz » Sun Apr 13, 2008 9:45 am

In reference to the bright features of rayed craters, and the item above on how certain photos show rays while other do not, i got a message that tells me Juergens pointed out that these features are superficial surface markings. I don't quite know what definition to apply here but it will become more clear as i review the articles of both contributors. d..z
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby StefanR » Fri Apr 18, 2008 3:47 pm

Dahlenaz wrote:In reference to the bright features of rayed craters, and the item above on how certain photos show rays while other do not,


Here is a little flashback from Page 2 of this thread:
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=1281#p1281
Image


and below is the Messenger post of april 17:
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/image.php?gallery_id=2&image_id=180
Image
Last week, the MESSENGER team learned that the impact crater seen in the middle of this Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) image has been officially named Eminescu.
Eminescu crater is 125 kilometers (78 miles) in diameter and can be seen just at the top of the image previously released on January 30. The image shown here was acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) on January 14, 2008, and shows a portion of Mercury's surface unseen by spacecraft prior to MESSENGER's historic flyby. Eminescu is a particularly interesting crater for several reasons. Eminescu formed more recently than most of the craters on Mercury, on the grounds that there are very few later craters superposed on it. Moreover, impressive chains of secondary craters, formed by material ejected by the impact explosion that formed the crater, radiate away from Eminescu. The central peaks within the crater are arranged in a circular pattern; geologists call this a “peak ring.” The bright peaks inside Eminescu exhibit unusual color characteristics in the 11-color Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images, which the MESSENGER Science Team is currently studying. They show up with a bluish tinge in the previously released false-color image of the entire planet; Eminescu is just north of the equator, near the day/night “terminator” in that image.


this reminds me of another previous item on Mars,

Mars Volcano Apollinaris Patera
Image
Dwarfed by Olympus Mons and the other immense shield volcanos on Mars, Apollinaris Patera rises only 3 miles or so into the thin martian atmosphere, but bright water-ice clouds can be still be seen hovering around its summit. Mars' volcanic structures known as "paterae" are not only smaller than its shield volcanos but older as well, with ages estimated to be around 3 billion years. Like Apollinaris Patera, narrow furrows typically extend from their central craters or calderas (These are better seen in the highrs picture) . It is thought that the paterae represent broad piles of easily eroded volcanic ash. This wide angle view of Apollinaris Patera was recorded last month by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The large central crater is about 50 miles across.
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap990513.html
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.
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Re: Electric discharges to dusty CRT match planetary features

Unread postby dahlenaz » Tue Apr 22, 2008 10:08 am

An update on ICOPS 2008.

A student from the town of Karlshure, Germany has accepted the offer to attend and place the poster presentation.

This is a pleasant development to have Jan Weiss participating and helping with the effort to place this poster.

The poster is coming together and is primarily images with suggestive captions. There is a link at this location;
http://www.para-az.com/poster08.html
so you can follow along, but the poster is being done in power point and is already 4 meg and i haven't yet figured out how to display it in html or something suitable for posting.


If anyone has a suggestion for additional images of radial trenchs from a central crater, please pass them or others along. Thanks and let me know how or if you want your credits to appear on the poster. d..z
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