Earth - tectonics and geology

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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The Great Dog
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by The Great Dog » Thu May 02, 2013 7:47 am

The Great Dog remembers a TPOD about the Dead Sea.

http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2008/ ... eadsea.htm

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GaryN
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by GaryN » Mon Jun 17, 2013 10:18 am

I just watched part one of a recent sciencechannel series called "Rise of the Continents". I started watching part two and gave up, as it seems like geologists are just creating a model of what lies below by examining cerain surface features and then assuring us that the only possible way those surface features and materials could form was if the underlying structures and materials conformed to the standard model of deep metamorphism by pressure and temperature. Cratons are a linchpin in the whole model, yet we can not know what is down there except by interpretation of instrumentally aquired data that can not be proven to be a true and accurate interpretation, but is rather the only interpretation that would support their bigger picture. Continental drift is another 'must' in their models, but I find their confidence in determining and describing what happened to the Earth over billions of years to be a rather pompous display of self-adulation.

Intro to the Series:
http://science.discovery.com/tv-shows/r ... continents
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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GaryN
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by GaryN » Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:59 pm

Interesting. A proposal for shock rather than mantle plumes in craton formation. If an EMP is then considered as the transformative force, rather than an impactor, then things begin to look, to me, to be dominated by EM rather than kinetic energy.

Cratons: stress melting during the Shock Dynamics event
Cratons are considered to be the oldest parts of continents, but are they? This page will present detailed information from professional geologic journals, and then offer a Shock Dynamics perspective.
http://www.newgeology.us/presentation41.html
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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Re: Dead Sea canyons

Unread post by kiwi » Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:27 pm

nick c wrote:Velikovsky wrote about the Dead Sea.
The Dead Sea region was the scene of an interplanetary electrical discharge when a powerful electrical spark leaped down from above or sprang up from the earth.

http://www.varchive.org/itb/nitrate.htm
http://www.varchive.org/itb/overthrow.htm
http://www.varchive.org/itb/deadsea.htm
http://www.varchive.org/itb/rift.htm
Hi Nick,

This has more than likely been covered, naturally the religous aspect of the content can be ignored,its certainly not my "thing" nor the reason for posting of course ..... to get to the interesting point ( from an EU perspective) .. wind on to the 6 minute Mark in the clip

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8zN827BvYs


Cheers mate, :D :? :idea: :arrow:




A more recent look ( although still pushing the "God" angle, I just exchange the word "God" for "Velikovsy" and it seem's to make the experience more palatable 8-) )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyM5NixXwEY
Last edited by kiwi on Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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starbiter
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Re: Dead Sea canyons

Unread post by starbiter » Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:36 pm

kiwi wrote:
nick c wrote:Velikovsky wrote about the Dead Sea.
The Dead Sea region was the scene of an interplanetary electrical discharge when a powerful electrical spark leaped down from above or sprang up from the earth.

http://www.varchive.org/itb/nitrate.htm
http://www.varchive.org/itb/overthrow.htm
http://www.varchive.org/itb/deadsea.htm
http://www.varchive.org/itb/rift.htm
Hi Nick,

This has more than likely been covered, naturally the religous aspect of the content can be ignored,its certainly not my "thing" nor the reason for posting of course ..... to get to the interesting point ( from an EU perspective) .. wind on to the 6 minute Mark in the clip

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8zN827BvYs


Cheers mate, :D :? :idea: :arrow:
Very interesting Kiwi. I believe the material surrounding the sulfur was molten dust which became rock. Thanks for the link.

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kiwi
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by kiwi » Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:41 pm

Cheer;s Mike, :D

What an interesting TPOD maybe?

Chromium6
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by Chromium6 » Sun Jun 30, 2013 7:08 pm

Interesting research on "Waves" underground. Centimeters for the moon today... but what about Venus/Jupiter/Mars in ancient history?
----------

How Earthquakes Heal Themselves—and Why That’s Important

A new study shows how fractures in rock can re-knit just like fractures in bones
By Michael D. Lemonick June 30, 20130

http://science.time.com/2013/06/30/how- ... important/
But down below, the quake also shattered rock on both sides of the fault itself, out to a distance of 1,000 ft. (304 m) or more, opening up a network of cracks. Over time, geologists have learned, those cracks gradually repair themselves. “We think it’s some combination of the rocks fusing back together,” says Brodsky, “along with water flowing through the cracks bearing minerals that crystallize. But we don’t really know.”

To begin trying to figure it out, Brodsky, lead author Lian Xue, a Santa Cruz graduate student, and several colleagues worked with geologists in China, who drilled a series of boreholes close to the fault very soon after the quake happened. For the next 18 months or so, they monitored the levels of groundwater in one of the holes, and saw the water rise and fall twice every day.

What they were seeing were tides in the rock itself. It isn’t just the ocean that experiences tidal forces, the solid Earth does as well, as gravity from the Moon pulls harder on one side of our planet at any given time than it does on the other. The tidal bulges are easy to see in the ocean, where they can reach several feet, but the change in dry land is only on the order of centimeters.

That’s enough, however, to squeeze groundwater in and out of the newly formed underground cracks, making the water in the borehole rise and fall with the twice-daily rhythm. But that rhythm changes: it takes time for the water to squeeze into the borehole as the cracks tighten during low tide — and as the cracks slowly repair themselves and water flows less easily, the investigators observed the delay getting longer and longer.

“That’s our secret sauce,” says Brodsky. “The only way this could happen is if the permeability of the rock is changing.”
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CharlesChandler
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by CharlesChandler » Mon Jul 15, 2013 4:19 am

Back to the original topic (i.e., tectonics), I think that I can make a convincing case that the primary near-surface heat source in the Earth is electric currents, but for a surprising reason: it's a conversion from gravitational potential. Under sufficient pressure, the granites/basalts inside the Earth become ionized. The evidence that this occurs even in the lower lithosphere is the way it undergoes plastic deformation, instead of fracturing as it normally would. Plasticity only becomes possible in a brittle substance when it is ionized, and therefore lacks the covalent bonds that would otherwise give it strength.

The implication of this is that changes in pressure will vary the degree of ionization, and thus drive telluric currents. I studied two conditions in which the pressure changes.

First, I looked at tidal forces. Gravity from the Moon raises and lowers the surface of the Earth 11 cm, twice a day. This deformation shouldn't be a heat source, since it occurs slowly, and isn't enough of a deflection to cause molecular rearrangements. But it is enough to vary the degree of ionization, and thus drive currents. Evidence of surface ionization attributable to tidal deformation was found in lightning patterns. The researchers found that lightning is 20% more likely at high tide. And this was in North Dakota, so the flow of water in nearby oceanic tides was not a factor. This can only mean that tidal deformation alters the degree of ionization inside the Earth.

Second, I showed that crustal deformation at plate boundaries explains the well-known electric currents associated with earthquakes, when compressive ionization is taken into account. I further demonstrate that these currents are not just effects. Rather, they are actually the causes of the quakes. Under pressure at a plate boundary, the crust is warped upwards. This relaxes the pressure underneath, reducing the degree of ionization, and thereby pulling electrons downward. The ohmic heating from the electric current causes the crust to expand, which warps it even more, which further reduces the underlying degree of ionization, and further encourages the electric current. Thus this constitutes a positive feedback loop capable of a runaway release of energy resulting in a catastrophic crustal fracture. All of the facts concerning quakes are consistent with this model, including crustal temperatures, electric currents, magnetic fields, electric fields, seismic wave behaviors, and aftershock swarms.

For more info, see Electronic Tectonics.
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by webolife » Wed Jul 17, 2013 7:29 am

CC,
I believe you have something there :!:
While others may persist in their objections to the term "gravitational potential" I believe the energy conversions and positive feedback system you have involving telluric currents are the best explanation I've heard for crustal deformation and seismic energy release. Plus they fit nicely with the theory I have propounded here and on other threads. ;) Furthermore, while it may be objected that magnetic fields are associated with electric currents rather than gravitational fields, when gravity is best understood as an electrigravitic phenomenon there is really no conflict in describing gravitation and magnetism as mutual fields, further unifying the EU perspective. Elsewhere, I've elicited the energy transformations at a hydroelectric dam to illustrate this unification.
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by CharlesChandler » Wed Jul 17, 2013 12:26 pm

webolife wrote:Plus they fit nicely with the theory I have propounded here and on other threads.
Please forgive me for not having gone through this entire thread, but can you point me to the key posts concerning your theory? I'd like to add it to my site (or you can do that), so I can get a look at what we're building here. ;)
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by Sparky » Tue Sep 10, 2013 11:49 am

CC:
For more info, see Electronic Tectonics : http://qdl.scs-inc.us/?top=9981
A great paper!

May have found support for the "resistive comet" hypothesis... :? ireallydonno :?
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Re: Earth - tectonics and geology

Unread post by Spektralscavenger » Wed Sep 11, 2013 4:09 pm

Hi everyone!

It´s safe to say that we don´t know what´s inside Earth (except a few kms depth) and the dynamics of continents and oceans is uncertain as well. I think continents grow like crystals over geological times. A recent picture of the day about Antartica and a couple of Wiki articles http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mu_(lost_continent) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zealandia_(continent) gave me an idea:
an "event" about 15,000 years ago sunk many lands between Alaska-Canada and Russia, many lands of Indonesia, Melanesia and Zealandia; separated Africa and South America (not that they were stack but much closer) and moved Antartica from the Pacific Ocean thousands of kms to the south among the most spectacular. About 5,000 years ago another event sunk many lands of Mediterranean (including the Spain-Africa connection) and Baltic sea (or maybe separated) and separated Africa from Saudi Arabia and Saudi Arabia from Asia among others.


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paper: Lightning erodes mountains

Unread post by Corona » Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:43 am

This should be a fairly important paper from an EU perspective. Of course more research has to be made.


Lightning strikes causing rocks to explode have for the first time been shown to play a huge role in shaping mountain landscapes in southern Africa, debunking previous assumptions that angular rock formations were necessarily caused by cold temperatures, and proving that mountains are a lot less stable than we think.

In a world where mountains are crucial to food security and water supply, this has vast implications, especially in the context of climate change.

Professors Jasper Knight and Stefan Grab from the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies at Wits University used a compass to prove – for the first time ever – that lightning is responsible for some of the angular rock formations in the Drakensburg.

http://www.wits.ac.za/newsroom/newsitem ... 21737.html

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An article on lightning as a geomorphic agent

Unread post by Siggy_G » Wed Oct 16, 2013 12:14 am

Science Daily has an article headlined:
"New Evidence On Lightning Strikes: Mountains a Lot Less Stable Than We Think"
Lightning strikes causing rocks to explode have for the first time been shown to play a huge role in shaping mountain landscapes in southern Africa, debunking previous assumptions that angular rock formations were necessarily caused by cold temperatures, and proving that mountains are a lot less stable than we think.
Knight and Grab mapped out the distribution of lightning strikes in the Drakensburg and discovered that lightning significantly controls the evolution of the mountain landscapes because it helps to shape the summit areas - the highest areas - with this blasting effect.
The paper which the article is based on has an even more interesting headline:
"Lightning as a geomorphic agent on mountain summits: Evidence from southern Africa"
Abstract:
The presence of angular bedrock-derived debris on mountain summits worldwide has usually been associated with present or past periglacial frost shattering, thermal fracturing and other climatically-mediated weathering processes. Climatic inferences are commonly made based on such geomorphological evidence, even if frost shattering and other processes are unlikely under present climatic conditions. This paper questions this assumed genetic link between present/past climate and production of angular bedrock-derived debris by describing the geomorphological impacts of lightning strikes on exposed mountain summits. Using examples from the high Drakensberg of eastern Lesotho, southern Africa, the impacts of lightning strikes are described, which include the generation of angular, fractured bedrock-derived debris. These impacts are identified in the field based on clear and unambiguous criteria that can be used to distinguish between lightning-induced weathering processes and those processes associated with ‘more typical’ alpine weathering. This paper argues that lightning strikes are an important geomorphic agent of, in particular, low-latitude mountain summits, and that to make uncritical climatic inferences based on the presence of ‘frost shattered debris’ on mountain summits is wholly erroneous.
This research is certainly a step towards the Electric Universe view of how geological formations occur. A couple of TPODs from the Earth Geology subject:
The Grand Canyon
Gradualism Versus Catastrophism

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