Filaments of Galaxies - A Clue to CR “Hotspots”

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Solar
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Filaments of Galaxies - A Clue to CR “Hotspots”

Unread post by Solar » Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:17 am

Article:
... study suggests that those particles come from the filaments of galaxies connected to the Virgo Cluster, in the sky around the hotspot and their locations in the sky are correlated to hotspot events with a high statistical significance.- Scientists shed new light on mystery origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray hotspot
Paper:
We here report the presence of filaments of galaxies, connected to the Virgo Cluster, on the sky around the hotspot, and a statistically significant correlation between hotspot events and the filaments. - Filaments of Galaxies as a Clue to the Origin of Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays: Jihyun Kim et al
Cosmic Ray Composition:
Almost 90% of the cosmic rays which strike the Earth's atmosphere are protons (hydrogen nuclei) and about 9% are alpha particles. Electrons amount to about 1% according to Chaisson & McMillan. - Hyperphysics
Air Showers:

"Air Showers": Cosmic Rays then interact to induce an avalanche (or "atmospheric breakdown") of particles including nuclear, muonic, and an "electromagnetic component". That is pretty interesting.

With this in mind, and considering the Sun, my question is: Are expectations that one relatively local electric current filament to "power the sun" unrealistic?
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden

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paladin17
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Re: Filaments of Galaxies - A Clue to CR “Hotspots”

Unread post by paladin17 » Wed Nov 13, 2019 3:58 pm

Solar wrote: With this in mind, and considering the Sun, my question is: Are expectations that one relatively local electric current filament to "power the sun" unrealistic?
According to this paper, the integral cosmic ray proton flux with energies >180 MeV did peak in January 2010 and was 0.42 pfu (1 pfu = 1 cm^(-2)*s^(-1)*sr^(-1)). During solar maximum in 2014 this flux fell (due to Forbush effect) to about 0.2 pfu.
(UPD: LISA Pathfinder reports very similar fluxes of >70 MeV protons of 0.32-0.47 pfu in 2016-2017).

So the flux to the Sun's surface (if my calculation is correct) should be about 6*10^22 particles per second during solar minimum - or less. In terms of current, that's about 4 kA. I don't think such a current might produce the activity that we observe (10^26 W of thermal emission power). Even the heliospheric current sheet carries something like 3 GA of current, so the cosmic ray contribution is just a tiny disturbance on top of that.

(Note also that this observation contradicts Juergens' anode model, as I've indicated in SAFIRE topic here).

However, I recently had a thought that the regulation of cosmic ray flux by solar activity pretty interestingly corresponds to the ENA emissions from the edge of the heliosphere. If ENA's are indeed caused by charge exchange (effectively - a current from the heliosphere to the interstellar medium), and their production is stronger during solar minimum, that seems like an additional way of dropping the excess charge for the Sun.
I.e.: during the maximum the incoming cosmic ray excess charge is lower, and thus ENA production (outgoing charge) is also lower. During the minimum both of these are higher.
It seems too naive to think this is exactly what's going on, but in general, I'd say, it makes sense.

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