The Electric Earth

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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The Hyper-sensitive Solar System part 2

Unread postby dahlenaz » Fri May 02, 2008 8:07 pm

In the previous version of thunderbolts forum the concept of our Hyper-sensitive Solar system was carried forward from its mentioning elsewhere (I) and it's formal presentation at ICOPS 2006. You'll find a PDF on the HTML page which can be found here: http://www.cybertrails.com/~zrwoaz/poster06.html. or here http://www.para-az.com/poster06.html

I bring this up again because a pattern of tornado activity associated with the movement of the moon through specific points in its orbit is continuing. I cannot say for sure whether the storm patterns are following that pattern or if an electrical breakdown point is being facilitated by lunar influence but i will again go out on the limb a state that there is a recurring pattern that deserves serious investigation. If there is a discharge component then it may even have larger implications for features and activity on other bodies, case in point the 2001 duststorm on Mars that started shortly after the earth passed between it and the Sun.

I'll try to make the contributions in the first discussion group available in the form of an html page rather than transferring it here. d....z
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby Solar » Sat May 03, 2008 5:14 pm

smartart wrote:I was reading Velikovsky in the 50s, then Pensee, SIS and here I am following The Electric Universe. But I still don't understand: OK - there is conductive plasma in space. OK - electricity (unknown source?) is flowing therein. Are planets part of the circutry? Is a planet with an iron core a preferential path to (higher resistance) plasma? Is there resistance heating of planets? Does some of the earth's "hot behaviour" result?


I don't think there are simple 'Yes' or 'No' answers to them. I would approach this from the point of view of plasma dynamics; 'iron core' or not.

Are planets part of the circutry?


I would say yes. For example:
-the Jupiter/Io electric current
-THEMIS: "The satellites have found evidence of magnetic ropes connecting Earth's upper atmosphere directly to the sun," - which is another vierfication of Birkeland's electrical approach
-Recent thread regarding "Electric Currents between the Moon and Earth" etc.

Point being that if there is to be some heating of a planet through Ohm's Law it would seem to be as that law would relate to electro-plasma dynamics since the dynamics between electricity and plasma are heirarchically inter-related and connected. Meaning that a resistive flow seen through Ohm's law as relates one type of plasma would be "bifurcation" (change in flow as a result of some critical parameter being reached) for the other type of plasma with which it interacts. So on and so on add infinitum.

Plasma Physics and engineering appears to use an Ohm's Law for a plasma.

Google hits for 'Ohm's Law & Plasma Dampening'

Google hits for 'Ohm's Law and Plasma Physics'

Is a planet with an iron core a preferential path to (higher resistance) plasma?


Only as an assumption in some model.

Is there resistance heating of planets? Does some of the earth's "hot behaviour" result?


I would conditionally say 'yes'.

But that would be through Ohm's Law as modified for electro-plasma dynamics (some, if not all, of which is interpreted as "collisional"). However, I think even that is still misleading.
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
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Re: The Hyper-sensitive Solar System part 2

Unread postby dahlenaz » Sat May 03, 2008 9:04 pm

Here is the an html recovered page as promissed.

http://www.para-az.com/h-s.ss.discussion.html

The in the last three months many tornados have populated the new moon period and several other the day closely associated with the parting of the fuull moon. The pattern is quite pronounced. d..z
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Re: The Hyper-sensitive Solar System part 2

Unread postby dahlenaz » Wed May 07, 2008 8:30 pm

When the pattern of orbital relationships, especially lunar, began to reveal some consistency one question came to mind in reference to a particular term and i still wonder if the term monsoon has any roots in lunar time associated with this type of rain event. I did find a research paper from India that was relating lunar phases to certain weather. Overlooking these patterns in favor of geo-centric thinking may have had consequences that i first pondered following Hurricane Katrina.

Unfortunately for the people of Myanmar, there may be another mark on the books of this type of observation of severe weather since the beginning of the new moon phase has again preceded a severe storm.

Observations based on patterns should not be ignored, especially when lives are in the balance. d...z
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Re: The Hyper-sensitive Solar System part 2

Unread postby Ion01 » Thu May 08, 2008 6:33 am

Tornado research is especially important to people like me who had a small one go through the back of my neighborhood yesterday! There were several houses that had lost most of their fencing and shingles (only several as there are only several houses in the back because they are building back there). My brother was there at the time and he watched it pick up some fencing and some 2x4's, that were left by the construction workers, an spin them around before tossing them one direction or another. It was quite a mess afterwards. Anyways, the tornado alarms didn't go off until it was a mile later as there wasn't a fully formed funnel to visually recognize it so the alarms were not set off until some spotters saw some debri being tossed around later. The scariest part is this is the second time in a month we have had such a close call in my neighborhood with late sirens.
If the electrical effect would actually be studied and understood then real predictions and warnings could be made in ample time. Even measure the magnetic field like in the desert dust devil experiments would give a much sooner indication! They have a sensor grid across the whole state in order to detect lightning so its not like it couldn't be done.
Anyways, with NASA recent admission of numerous electrical effects on the moon when it goes through the tail of the earth, http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080420123319.htm, this correlation between the moon and storms should not be ignored.
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90 degree branching

Unread postby bdw000 » Fri Jul 25, 2008 4:25 pm

This is a question from a NON expert in these matters (and a very big FAN of EU theory).

I am not trying to attack EU theory with this post, I just want to make sure that I undestand what is being said and have not missed an important little detail. I am not trying to be nit-picky to annoy you :)

I remember reading on this site quite a few times the idea that lichtenberg-like geological features have "90 degree branching," as opposed to water erosion caused features that tend to be more like 45 degrees or less. If I have something wrong right here, please let me know.

And yet it seems to me that I have seen many lichtenberg/dendritic features posted on this site that have, well, quite a few branchings that are definitely NOT 90 degrees.

Check out these pics from rangerover777's site:

http://www.leedskalnin.net/Lightnings-pics.htm

(start with the figures about half-way down, labelled "lightning imprint on concrete sidewalk."

The "concrete sidewalk" photo on the left is a perfect example of the "90 degree" phenomenon.

But the "concrete sidewalk" photo on the right seems to be full of nothing but 45 degree branches.

And they are both from lightning.

So my question is: have I missed a more detailed discussion of "90 degree branching"? How exactly do we need to look at the degree of branching in dendritic geological features?

More importantly, I was looking at many TPODs saying, "yeah, well, maybe, but there are just too many branches that are definitley not 90 degrees. Maybe they are right, but maybe they are not." I will guess that others may do the same, using the "90 degree angle" criteria to say that some dendritic features must NOT be electrical in nature, because they have angles that are way less than 90 degrees.

Have I missed something? Or, do you need to be a little more specific about this 90 degree branching criteria? Right now, my take is that 90 degree branching might be used to rule out water erosion, but that 45 degree branching can NOT be used to rule out electrical causes.
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Re: 90 degree branching

Unread postby MGmirkin » Fri Jul 25, 2008 5:58 pm

Well, I think that the issue is more one of which has an easier time explaining 90 deg side-channels, electrical excavation, or flowing fluids (liquid erosion theory). A flowing river will tend to follow the path of least resistance. Generally a sharp 90 deg side-channel is not expected of fluid erosion. Much less more than one 90 deg side channel in the same location, crossing the path of least resistance without diverting.

The issue comes up in regard to images like the "strange lava tubes" of Arsia Mons

(More Strange Lava Tubes of Mars)
http://thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch ... avonis.htm

I don't think there's necessarily an impetus saying that all electrical discharges MUST be at right angles. Just that electrical discharges CAN do things at 90 degrees to itself, if that makes sense. IE, you CAN have a main channel and ALSO have side-channels branching at 90 deg without being inconsistent. However, being that discharges can be filamentary, and filaments can be composed of somewhat braided sub-filaments, it may be that the braiding at some point unbraids and you get multiple distinct channels, branching off the main channel. Not necessarily at 90 deg though...

Had kind of the same question a while back, and that was the conclusion that I came to. Don't know whether it's representative of any particular consensus, but it makes sense to me. As you say, it's rather obvious that SOME discharges DO branch at 90 deg (the sidewalk fulgurite from Minneapolis [the left one, poached from either me, notjustrocks.com or the original blog entry @ celestial monochord] is a good example). But some certainly branch at smaller angles.

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The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby sbyers11 » Tue Oct 21, 2008 11:38 am

Gentlemen of the Electric Universe,

I have been conducting an unsucessful search in trying to find out what the surface charge of the Earth is in relation to the interior of the Earth. There are many reports that say that the voltage is negative in relation to the atmosphere, but I am interested in the E field gradient as measured within a mine shaft or well borehole. I expect that I will have to contact a University Geology Dept. , but I think some EU proponents may already have the answer.

It is assumed that any excess charge within the Earth will abide by the Van de Graaf effect and collect on the surface. This is expected to leave the interior with the opposite voltage. I am mainly interested in the reports of actual measurments and will not be able to depend on any of my theories or past assumptions. While reports of E field intensity as found with an electrometer are closely related, my requirement is to find the polarity of the E field gradient within the Earth.

If an "insulated" ground conductor is grounded at the surface of a mine and left ungrounded wihin the mine well below the surface, a high impedence meter or an electrometer should be able to detect the polarity between the open end of the conductor and local ground rods within the mine.
All links and suggestion that may lead me to this information will be appreciated. I have completed searches via Google search modes: WEb,...Groups,...Scholar,... and Books. The best results came when searching for the term [Earth Charge].

Thanks in advance, until your are better paid. Cheers
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Re: The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby sbyers11 » Thu Oct 23, 2008 9:09 am

Gentlemen,

I have also posted this question on the following newsgroups and there have been some helpful replys. The newsgroups are; sco.physics,...sci.physics.relativity,...sci.physics.electromag,...and sci.geo.geology. The post heading is
"Earth's Internal E Field Polarity ?? "

Cheers, Stan Byers

Gravity and Inertia via Radiation
http://home.netcom.com/~sbyers11/
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Re: The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby GaryN » Sat Oct 25, 2008 1:25 pm

I would have thought someone would have done an experiment on that, but I don't see anything on the 'net. Perhaps the Kola borehole crew have some info, but I don't speak Russian and can find no English contact info.

Here is a video of some kids dropping stones down a deep hole. The noises coming from the shaft don't sound like stones hitting the sides of the hole, they are sharp cracking sounds, and the bigger rock seems to produce a blowback at one point. Static discharges?

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=JT-INK5yHLA

I think I'll try and locate a dry water well hole locally and do some experimenting. Maybe my old oscilloscope will turn up something!
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby Solar » Sat Oct 25, 2008 3:55 pm

Try these:

Electric Field on Earth
And:

On the earth’s surface, the electric field can be as strong as 100 to 300 V/m. This means that if you are out in the open,
and away from buildings or other things that would affect the field, there can be a few hundred volts between your head
and your toes!
- Earth’s vertical electric field

And:

Google Search for Earth's Electric Field

And, you might be able to use the image on the following page below for you article or whatever because it appears that it is an ultraviolet image of the Earth's electric field taken from by Apollo 16:
The photo shows an positive electric field, comprised of hydrogen ions, around the Earth brought about by light photons knocking electrons out of their gas molecule orbits. This electrical field has outer layers that are +350,000 volts DC relative to ground, extending 16,000 miles into space. Longer exposures show that the geocorona extends to 100,000 miles. - Resonant Coil Project
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
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Re: The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby Solar » Sun Oct 26, 2008 7:33 am

"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
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Re: The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby sbyers11 » Tue Oct 28, 2008 8:55 am

Hello Solar and Group,

Thanks for posting the link to 'Observation and Analysis of Vertical Electric fields of the Earth".
http://seismo.berkeley.edu/annual_repor ... ode22.html
That article comes close to giving the data we are looking for, and does show that a field exists. The data does record the relative magnitude of the vertical E field within the Earth, but since it does not provide the polarity,... we are still on the search. I believe that a contact measurement or a field mill type measurement will have to be made to give the final answer.

Cheers, Stan Byers
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Re: The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby Solar » Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:32 pm

What an interesting area of research.

This seems like such a simple thing to have been done but apparently it hasn't been or this type of data lies elsewhere under a different nomenclature. It is interesting because it appears to verify a theory I have. So called "earths currents", or telluric currents etc appear to be generated in the same manner as discussed in the superconductivity thread. However, these subsurface currents are also called "Geomagnetically induced current" (GIC):

A time-varying magnetic field external to the Earth induces electric currents in the conducting ground. These currents create a secondary (internal) magnetic field. As a consequence of Faraday's law of induction, an electric field at the surface of the Earth is induced associated with time variations of the magnetic field. The surface electric field causes electrical currents, known as geomagnetically induced currents (GIC), to flow in any conducting structure, for example, a power or pipeline grid grounded in the Earth. This electric field, measured in V/km, acts as a voltage source across networks. - Geomagnetically induced current


Interesting photo link to that article as well. The induced surface E-Field reminds me of the "pinning sites" of superconductivity.

Another interesting abstract:
A surface electric field model is used to estimate the UK surface E field during the 30 October 2003 severe geomagnetic storm. This model is coupled with a power grid model to determine the flow of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) through the Scottish part of the UK grid. Model data are compared with GIC measurements at four sites in the power network. During this storm, measured and modeled GIC levels exceeded 40 A, and the surface electric field reached 5 V/km at sites in the United Kingdom (compared with quiet-time levels of less than 0.1 V/km). The electric field and grid models now form part of a GIC monitoring, analysis... - Subsurface electric fields...


Crustal conductivity would seem to dictate that the resulting horizontal geoelectric field would have "anomolus" vertical electric fields which would seem to indicate the presence of such "pinning sites". So vertical E-field measurements wouldn't be static but would vary according to location and conductivity of the crustal composition of the particular area as well as being affected by wheather. These facets are definitely being tied to earthquakes such as with this abstract from Geophysical Laboratory of Thessaloniki, Greece.

It appears that when referencing Earth's horizontal geoelectric component the polarity is discussed in terms of "north-south" and "east-west".

That doesn't specifically help with the vertical E-Field polarity question but I just wanted to throw in some extra nomenclature that may help with your search i.e. GIC's, "geoelectric field", and "vertical geoelectric field" etc. This, the changing face of nomenclature, seems a constant problem due to 'overspecialization'. Nonetheless, I'm pretty sure this confirms for me that the inductive process as demonstrated in superconducting materials is the same for planets. Very happy with that so far. So thank you very much.
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
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Re: The Earth's Elec. Charge Polarity

Unread postby junglelord » Sun Nov 02, 2008 4:29 pm

Seems to me that our local Dowser, Kevin, would expound on that.
Its a wonderful 3-D EM inclusive to acknowledge the Sub-Surface E Field.
I have always been "attracted" to the Fair Weather Circuit, myself.
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